Salad Bowl Garden

Red Winter Kale

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Tons of nutrition and flavor packed into petite leaves!  Tenderer than full-sized leaves, kale baby greens are best enjoyed raw.  These can be grown indoors at any time of year and are a nutrient-packed way to get your “green fix” in winter.  They’re loaded with vitamins A and C with big boosts of calcium, protein, iron and fiber.  Move containers as needed for best light exposure and temperature (about 60˚-70˚).  Use a shallow container with about 1”-2” of potting soil.  Sow 1/8”-1/4” deep with a light layer of soil.  Plants should be ready for harvest within 25-30 days, or when 2”-4” tall.

Arugula

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Add new flavor to everyday salads!  High in vitamin C and potassium, arugula’s peppery flavor is the perfect balance tossed simply with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and Parmesan cheese.  Arugula baby greens can be grown indoors at any time of year and are a nutrient-packed way to get your “green fix” in winter.  Keep in a shallow container with about 1”-2” of potting soil.  Sow 1/8”-1/4” deep with a light layer of soil.  Plants should be ready for harvest within 15-20 days, or when 2”-4” tall.

Basil-Italian Genovese

There is nothing like the aroma of basil in the summer!  This variety, Genovese basil, has a particularly strong fragrance and flavor, making it excellent for almost any basil dish, especially pesto.  Edible flowers are tasty in salads.  There is no more useful herb.  In a warm, sunny, window, basil can grow indoors in winter!  Basil needs warm temperatures to germinate, november-seeding-class-3so put by a warm window or heat with a heat lamp.  Sow about ¼” deep.  Sprouts will take
about 5-10 days to emerge.  Basil should be harvested before the plant flowers. The leaves have more flavor when harvested in the morning. The young, top leaves taste the best, and should be used fresh; the older leaves may be used for vinegar and pesto. Cut a few stems but never more than 1/3 of the plant. Wash stems, gently shake dry, and strip the leaves off the stem.

Basil-Sweet Thai

november-seeding-class-4Thai basil is a popular herb in Southeast Asian cuisine and is a flavorful garnish served with Vietnamese pho.  It holds its flavor and texture better after cooking than other basil varieties and adds a kick to salads when sliced and eaten fresh.  Sweet Thai’s dark purple flowers and intoxicating scent make it a beautiful addition to the flower garden.  Growing instructions are the same as Italian Genovese Basil.

Lettuce

november-seeding-class-5Fill your bowl with the mixed colors of this lettuce variety.  This blend has it all: delicious, pretty, sweet leaves in a heat-tolerant variety.  The greens and reds look so beautiful in salads and sandwiches.  Harvest young for terrific baby greens.  Sow 1/8” deep and cover with a very light layer of soil.  Individual leaves can be harvested any time as desired. The whole plant can be sheared to 2″ above ground level when plant is up to 8″ in diameter; more leaves will be produced.

Cilantro (foliage)/Coriander (seed)

november-seeding-class-6Also called Chinese parsley, cilantro has a thousand uses in the kitchen.  It has excellent flavor, improved leafiness and slow-to-bolt.  Add a sprig to soup or add chopped leaves to any Mexican, Caribbean, or Asian dishes.  The crushed seeds add intriguing flavor to stews, beans, and cookies.  They can be grown indoors for fresh cilantro year-round.  Grows best in cool temperatures.  Sow seeds ½” deep below soil.  Sprouts should arrive between 5-10 days.  Foliage can be harvested any time. Seeds should be harvested after they begin to turn brown and when the outer coat cracks, but before they drop off the plant and scatter. Cut stem and place in a brown paper sack to collect the seeds. Rubbing the seeds will cause the outer shell to drop off.

 

November Seeding

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